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Lagerweij Consulting and Coaching

Agile On The Beach Talk

Ciarán and I had a wonderful time at the Agile on the Beach conference this last week. We did the first full version of our talk: “The ‘Just Do It’ approach to change management”;. I did an earlier version of the talk at the DARE conference in Antwerp earlier this year, but this longer version has gone through quite a few changes in the mean time. The conference was set-up very well, and it was great to talk to so many people working on Agile in the UK.

DevOps and Continuous Delivery

Both of these are simply logical extensions of Agile and Lean software development practices. DevOps is one particular instance of the Agile multi-functional team. Continuous Delivery is the result of Agile’s practice of automating any repeating process, and in particular enabled by automated tests and continuous integration. And both of those underlying practices are the result of optimizing your process to take any delays out of it, a common Lean practice.

Scaling Agile with Set-Based Design

I wrote a while back about set-based design, and just recently about a way to frame scaling Agile as a mostly technical consideration. In this post I want to continue with those themes, combining them in a model for scaled agile for production and research. Scale In the previous post, we found that we can view scale as a function of the possibilities for functional decomposition, facilitated by a strong focus on communication through code (customer tests, developer tests, simple design, etc.

The ‘Just Do It’ Approach To Change Management

Last Friday I gave a talk at the Dare 2013 conference in Antwerp. The talk was about the experiences I and my colleague Ciarán ÓNeíll have had in a recent project, in which we found that sometimes a very directive, Just Do It approach will actually be the best way to get people in an agile mindset. Update: the full video of this talk as given at ‘Agile on the Beach’ is available on youtube.

Conway’s Organizational Structure Heuristic

organizations which design systems … are constrained to produce designs which are copies of the communication structures of these organizations. — Melvin Conway We often run into examples of Conway’s Law in organizations where silo-ed departments prompt architectural choices that are not supportive of good software design. The multi-functional nature of Agile teams is one way to prevent this from happening. But why not turn that around? If we know that organizational structure influences our software design, shouldn’t we let the rules of good software design inform our organizational structure?

Scaling Agile?

There’s a lot of discussion in the Agile community on the matter of scaling agile. Should we all adopt Dean Leffingwell’s Scaled Agile Framework? Do the Spotify tribe/squad thing? Or just roll our own? Or is Ron Jeffries’ intuition right, and do the terms scaling and agile simply not mix? Ron’s stance seems to be that many of Agile’s principles simply don’t apply at scale. Or apply in the same way, so why act differently at scale?